Gipi

In Flux

Posted on:  September 13, 2007


Updates have been few and far between lately with lots of things converging both work wise and personal. I’ve been drawing but not a whole lot for myself so today I really put it in my head that not matter how busy things are, i’ll squeeze in a quick sketch or two.

I‘ve always made it part of my daily routine to always sketch something for myself even if it’s a small little doodle on a post-it. But work demands don’t always make it easy. Perhaps I just need to get a little selfish again….

Many things are cooking as usual in the idea kitchen. I’m mulling book and art projects and of course work is continuing on STEEL NOODLES book number one.

Been catching up on reading as well. I’m still way behind especially with a fresh new batch of books from Comic-Con. I’m really into the amazing italian artist GIPI right now and I just finished “Garage Band” and “Notes for a War Story“. Two very poignant and powerful pieces of art and writing. His book the “The Innocents” blew me away and was one of the best from last year. The man is truly gifted. A link to his blog is in the sidebar if you care to check it out.

Having met the legendary Syd Mead during the opening of the VISIONS exhibit here in L.A. for a few minutes was really energizing and has got me into a “Mead” mode of late. A recent visit to bookseller extraordinaire Stuart Ng‘s new showroom was a real treat as well. There was where I found a real rare (and mint) copy of KRONOTEKO, a japanese-printed collection of Mead’s art including his work in Blade Runner, 2010 and Star Trek: The Motion Picture (among others). I’ve only seen this book once before ages ago and seeing it at Stuart’s made my day. Needless to say I went home a happy man with my copy in tow. I’m still gawking at it as I type this post.

And speaking of gawking, the other book i’ve been really been getting a lot out of is the hefty and humblingly sublime WILL EISNER SKETCHBOOK. This is a veritable master class in making comics. Seeing Mr. Eisner’s themes and layouts in rough pencil form is simply marvelous. His ink work is well known and distinct, but seeing his sketch technique really reveals a lot about him and his thought process. I’ll be reading (and learning) from this book for quite sometime.